Skip to main content

Camp FAQs

Clarity and communication is important to us at SOAR. If you have further questions, please contact us.

Helpful Information

Outlined below are answers to the most common questions we receive from parents before, during, and after camp.

For answers to common financial related questions, go here!

Camp Activities Explained

Archery

Archery is a sport that involves using a bow and arrows to shoot at targets. The objective of archery is to accurately hit a target at a specified distance using the bow to launch arrows.At camp, archery typically takes place in a designated area with targets set up at varying distances. Trained staff members supervise the activity, ensuring safety and providing guidance to campers.

Caving / Spelunking

Caving, also known as spelunking, is the recreational activity of exploring natural underground cave systems. It involves crawling, climbing, and sometimes even swimming through narrow passageways, chambers, and tunnels that can be hundreds or thousands of feet below the ground.

Fishing

Fishing at SOAR involves using a fishing rod, line, and bait or lures to catch fish. Campers enjoy access to SOAR’s onsite fishing equipment along with sessions on fishing techniques and how to clean and cook what their catch.

Hiking

At SOAR hiking means day hiking or day trekking through outdoor terrain for shorter periods, not over night.

Horsepacking

Horsepacking with SOAR combines hiking and horse riding with camping in the backcountry. It involves using horses to carry gear, equipment, and supplies into remote areas.

Hatchet Throwing

Hatchet throwing is when you throw hatchets at a wooden target. It improves hand-eye coordination and accuracy. The game typically involves throwing hatchets or small axes at a wooden target marked with a bullseye and point values.

Mountain Biking

Mountain biking is a type of cycling that where you bicycles off-road on rough, rocky, and steep terrain. It is a popular outdoor activity that can be enjoyed by people of all ages and skill levels, and can be done in a variety of environments such as forests, mountains, and deserts.

Rappelling

Rappelling is a technique used to descend vertical surfaces, such as cliffs or canyons, using a rope and specialized equipment. It is often used in outdoor activities such as rock climbing, caving, and canyoning. To rappel, the person ties a rope to a secure anchor point at the top of the descent, then uses a rappel device, which is attached to the rope, to control their descent as they lower themselves down the vertical surface. 

Swimming

Far far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts. Separated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean. A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia. It is a paradisematic country, in which roasted parts of sentences fly into your mouth.

General Camp FAQs

Q. How can my child benefit from the SOAR program?

SOAR has a two-fold emphasis. First, we assist our participants in building self-esteem, self-reliance, and self-confidence. Secondly, we encourage our participants to develop critical life skills such as organization and time management skills; decision-making and problem-solving skills; communication and social skills; and frustration management skills. Participants then learn strategies which enable them to translate skills learned while on the program in to their everyday situations at home and in the classroom.

Q. Is SOAR a therapeutic wilderness program?

No. SOAR is not a therapeutic boot camp or wilderness therapy program. Therapeutic programs typically serve youth with severe behavioral or psychological issues or drug problems and SOAR serves youth who are generally well behaved but may get into mild trouble due to impulsivity or social skill related conflicts.

Q. What is the typical profile of a child attending this program?

SOAR serves youth and young adults, ages 8-25, with learning disabilities and/or attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder. SOAR participants generally enjoy the out-of-doors, are energetic and active, and thrive in a small group environment.

Most SOAR participants are high functioning and struggle with issues such as impulsivity, disorganization, oppositionality, inattention, challenges with social skills, etc. Some participants may have additional diagnoses such as Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Tourettes, Autism Spectrum Disorder Level 1, or Generalized Anxiety Disorder, among others. Although participants may have experienced lowered self-esteem and academic frustration prior to attending SOAR, they are essentially well-adjusted individuals.

In order to provide a safe, effective environment for participants and staff we do not accept students with active suicidal ideation/attempts, psychotic symptoms, acute/chronic violence, or active substance abuse issues. Participants with significant behavioral challenges are discouraged from applying. Medical conditions such as diabetes (insulin-dependent), epilepsy, cardiac conditions, or other conditions may prevent students from being accepted.

SOAR welcomes youth and young adults diagnosed with ADHD and/or Learning Disabilities (and their siblings) of any race, religion, sexual orientation or identity, national or ethnic origin, and disability (assuming the disability permits safe participation in the essential activities of SOAR courses as currently defined).

Q. What is the recommended functioning level of SOAR participants?

Language is comprehensible by others and appropriate to age level.

The camper is able to participate in activities that require conversation skills, following verbal directions, and managing self-care and hygiene.

Campers should be able to fully participate in the physical nature of the outdoor adventure components of the program. Participants requiring consistent 1 to 1 care and assistance or an inordinate amount of staff supervision are discouraged from applying.

Q. Can siblings without ADHD and/or Learning Disabilities attend SOAR camp?

SOAR welcomes youth and young adults diagnosed with ADHD and/or Learning Disabilities (and their siblings) of any race, religion, sexual orientation or identity, national or ethnic origin, and disability (assuming the disability permits safe participation in the essential activities of SOAR courses as currently defined).

Q. Will my 11 year old be in the same group as an 18 year old?

Many of our courses are open to a wide age range of applicants. Our goal is to split the campers into smaller groups by their age but depending upon enrollment, this may not always be possible.

Preparing For Camp

Q. Do I need to buy everything on the gear list?

The gear lists were developed with careful consideration of the needs of each student depending upon the length of the course and the course environment. Therefore, it is vital to send everything on the gear list with your child in order to maximize their comfort, safety, and enjoyment while on course. Please consult our Gear Guide for additional information and guidance.

Q. Does my child need a backpack or a duffle bag?

Some courses require a backpack while others are best suited for duffle bag use. Please consult your gear list to find out which is required for your child’s course. If the purchase of a backpack is restrictive, SOAR has a limited number of backpacks available for use on a first-come, first-serve basis. Please contact Admissions at SOAR if you would like to reserve one.

Q. Is a passport needed for international trips?

Yes, a passport is required for travel to and from all International Courses.

Q. What is the inbrief and debrief process?

The “inbrief” is an opportunity for you to talk with your child’s adventure camp staff prior to their arrival for a SOAR program. You will discuss what will take place on the course, review the student’s goal, and review any medications that the staff will be responsible for administering.

During the “debrief” at the end of the course the staff will meet with you again to process your child’s experience at SOAR. They will review goal progress, your child’s success and accomplishments, and strategies for use at home.

While At Camp

Q. How do SOAR staff handle administration of medications?

SOAR staff receive extensive training on all aspects of medication administration, including information about the common types taken by LD and ADHD youth, their purpose and contraindications, as well as a standard protocol for administering the medication. Your campers instructor will hold onto and manage all meds for the duration of camp. SOAR instructors will review your child’s medication information during the Inbrief process. It is imperative that your child is sent with enough medication to last the entirety of the course, plus two days extra.

Q. Does my child need a backpack or a duffle bag?

Some courses require a backpack while others are best suited for duffle bag use. Please consult your gear list to find out which is required for your child’s course. If the purchase of a backpack is restrictive, SOAR has a limited number of backpacks available for use on a first-come, first-serve basis. Please contact Admissions at SOAR if you would like to reserve one.

Q. Is a passport needed for international trips?

Yes, a passport is required for travel to and from all International Courses.

Q. What is the inbrief and debrief process?

The “inbrief” is an opportunity for you to talk with your child’s adventure camp staff prior to their arrival for a SOAR program. You will discuss what will take place on the course, review the student’s goal, and review any medications that the staff will be responsible for administering.

During the “debrief” at the end of the course the staff will meet with you again to process your child’s experience at SOAR. They will review goal progress, your child’s success and accomplishments, and strategies for use at home.